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Chief Rabbi blames late Apple boss Steve Jobs for selfish 'i' products

Discussion in 'Tech, Gadgets & Science Forum' started by bagamoyo, Nov 23, 2011.

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    bagamoyo JF-Expert Member

    Nov 23, 2011
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    The UK's Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks has claimed the late Apple boss Jonathan Jobs and his company's 'i' products are responsible for creating a selfish consumer culture that is spreading unhappiness throughtout society.

    Speaking at an interfaith reception attended by the Queen, Lord Sacks compared Jobs' iPad computers to the tablets of stone bearing the Ten Commandments given to Moses by God.

    He said: 'People are looking for values other than the values of a consumer society. The values of a consumer society really aren’t ones you can live by for terribly long.
    [​IMG] Steve Jobs passed away in October (Pic: AP)
    'The consumer society was laid down by the late Steve Jobs coming down the mountain with two tablets, iPad one and iPad two, and the result is that we now have a culture of iPod, iPhone, iTune, i, i, i.

    'When you're an individualist, egocentric culture and you only care about 'i’, you don’t do terribly well.'

    Lord Sacks advised that the key to happiness lay not in worrying about the latest gadgets, but in spending time with your family.

    'What does a consumer ethic do? It makes you aware all the time of the things you don't have instead of thanking God for all the things you do have,' he said.

    'If in a consumer society, through all the advertising and subtly seductive approaches to it, you've got an iPhone but you haven’t got a fourth generation one, the consumer society is in fact the most efficient mechanism ever devised for the creation and distribution of unhappiness.'

    A spokesperson for the Chief Rabbi later said Sacks' words were not meant as an attack on Apple or the late Jobs, who died in October, but were merely a warning about the potential dangers of consumerism.

    Read more: Chief Rabbi blames late Apple boss Steve Jobs for selfish 'i' culture | Metro.co.uk