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Benedict XVI Kutembelea Uingereza 16-19 september, 2010

Discussion in 'Habari na Hoja mchanganyiko' started by minda, Sep 16, 2010.

  1. minda

    minda JF-Expert Member

    Sep 16, 2010
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    naedit kidogo tu...

    September 16, 2010, 3:02 AM
    By Jeffrey Donovan
    Sept. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Almost five centuries since King Henry VIII split from the Catholic Church, the pope arrives in Britain today for a first state visit, with protesters lining up along with Queen Elizabeth II to greet him.

    Benedict’s trip is a state visit because he was invited as a head of state by the U.K. government. John Paul came on a purely pastoral, or religious, visit.
    While the Queen, 84, will welcome Benedict, 83, at Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh on his first stop today, the pope’s main business in the U.K. will be to announce the beatification of Cardinal John Henry Newman, a 19th-century Anglican, or Church of England, convert to Catholicism.

    There are about 5 million Catholics in England, according to the church’s website. There are some 25 million baptized Anglicans in England, about half the country’s population, a Church of England spokesman said.
    After arriving in Edinburgh, Benedict will travel to Glasgow to hold Mass in the park where predecessor John Paul II worshiped 28 years ago. U.K. Catholic officials said the crowds for Benedict are unlikely to match the turnout for John Paul.

    Benedict will give a speech on Sept. 17 at London’s Westminster Hall, where Catholic St. Thomas More was tried and sentenced in 1535 for denying that King Henry VIII was supreme head of the Church of England. There, he will also greet former U.K. premiers including Margaret Thatcher, Catholic convert Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, who first invited him to Britain.

    The next day, he will meet with Prime Minister David Cameron and acting opposition leader Harriet Harman prior to a prayer vigil in London’s Hyde Park.
    “Not everyone will agree with everything the pope says,” Cameron said this week. “But that should not prevent us from acknowledging that the Pope’s broader message can help challenge us to ask searching questions about our society and about how we treat ourselves and each other.”
    “The pope’s mission is the re-evangelization of Europe,” he said. “I think you can encourage the faithful while at the same being beaten up by the unfaithful.”

    Source: Jeffrey Donovan in Rome at jdonovan26@bloomberg.net