Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

Babu wa America (history related)

Discussion in 'Habari na Hoja mchanganyiko' started by Ufunuo wa Yohana, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. U

    Ufunuo wa Yohana JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Apr 3, 2011
    Joined: Oct 9, 2007
    Messages: 316
    Likes Received: 3
    Trophy Points: 35
    Chukua muda kusoma hii habari ingawa in ndefu (vumilia) halafu utoe maoni inafanana vipi na ile ya Babu wa Loliondo AU inatofautiana vipi


    George Washington Carver (1864-1943), was an agricultural chemist of international fame who revolutionized the economy of the south by introducing hundreds of uses for the peanut, soybean, pecan and sweet potato in the place of cotton. These crops not only replenished the soil, but provided income for the south which has since grown into the hundreds of millions of dollars.


    His discoveries from the peanut (over 300), the sweet potato (over 118), as well as from the soybean, etc., included cosmetics, face powder, lotion, shaving cream, vinegar, cold cream, printer's ink, salad oil, rubbing oil, instant coffee, leather stains from mahogany to blue, synthetic tapioca, egg yolk, flour, paints, non-toxic colors (from which crayons were eventually created).


    Henry Ford became personal friends with Dr. Carver, being fascinated with his method of deriving rubber from milkweed. Mr. Ford tried many times to get Dr. Carver to join him in business, but Carver was committed to helping his people and the south. Mr. Ford built a duplicate of Dr. Carver's birthplace at his Dearborn Village, and built a school for children named George Washington Carver School.


    George Washington Carver was visited at Tuskegee Institute by Vice-President Calvin Coolidge, as well as by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He became a confidant and advisor to leaders and scientists from all over the world, from Thomas Edison to Mahatma Gandhi. (Edison also offered him a position with a six figure income, but Carver turned it down).


    Years ago I went into my laboratory and said, "Dear Mr. Creator, please tell me what the universe was made for?"


    The Great Creator answered, "You want to know too much for that little mind of yours. Ask for something more your size, little man."


    Then I asked. "Please, Mr. Creator, tell me what man was made for?"


    Again the Great Creator replied, "You are still asking too much. Cut down of the extent and improve the intent."


    So then I asked, "Please, Mr. Creator, will you tell me why the peanut was made?"


    "That's better, but even then it's infinite. What do you want to know about the peanut?"


    "Mr. Creator, can I make milk out of the peanut?"


    "What kind of milk do you want? Good Jersey milk of just plain boarding house milk?"


    "Good Jersey milk."


    And then the Great Creator taught me to take the peanut apart and put it together again. And out of the process have come forth all these products! - 1920, in speaking at Blue Ridge, North Carolina to the Young Mens Christian Association. Ethel Edwards, Carver of Tuskegee (Cincinnati, Ohio: Ethel Edwards & James T. Hardwick, a limited edition work compiled in part from over 300 personal letters written by Dr. Carver to James T. Hardwick between 1922-1937, available from the Carver Memorial in Locust Grove, Diamond, Mo., 1071), pp. 114-117.


    "Dr. Carver, how did you learn all of these things?"


    Carver answered:


    "From an old book"


    "What book?" asked the Senator.


    Carver replied, "The Bible."


    The Senator inquired, "Does the Bible tell about peanuts?"


    "No Sir" Dr. Carver replied, "But it tells about the God who made the peanut. I asked Him to show me what to do with the peanut, and he did." - ibid


    George Washington Carver named his laboratory God's Little Workshop and never took any scientific textbooks into it, as he would just ask God how to perform his experiments.


    "God is going to reveal to us things He never revealed before if we put our hands in His. No books ever go into my laboratory. The thing I am to do and the way of doing it are revealed to me. I never have to grope for methods. The method is revealed to me the moment I an inspired to create something new. Without God to draw aside the curtain I would be helpless." - November 19, 1924, in a speech before 500 people of the Women's Board of Domestic Missions in New York City's Marble Collegiate Church. Ethel Edwards, Carver of Tuskegee (Cincinnati, Ohio: Ethel Edwards & James T. Hardwick, a limited edition work compiled in part from over 300 personal letters written by Dr. Carver to James T. Hardwick between 1922-1937, available from the Carver Memorial in Locust Grove, Diamond, Mo., 1071), pp. 141-142.


    "Only alone can I draw close enough to God to discover His secrets." - Ethel Edwards, Carver of Tuskegee (Cincinnati, Ohio: Ethel Edwards & James T. Hardwick, a limited edition work compiled in part from over 300 personal letters written by Dr. Carver to James T. Hardwick between 1922-1937, available from the Carver Memorial in Locust Grove, Diamond, Mo., 1071), pp. 183, 199.


    In 1939, George Washington Carver was awarded the Roosevelt Medal, with the declaration:


    "To a scientist humbly seeking the guidance of God and a liberator to men of the white race as well as the black." - 1939, in the citation made at the presentation of the Roosevelt Medal. Henry M. Morris, Men of Science - Men of God (El Cajon, CA: Master Books, Creation Life Publishers, Inc., 1990), pp. 81-83.


    George Washington Carver remarked:


    "The secret of my success? It is simple. It is found in the Bible, "In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths." - Bless Your Heart (series II) (Eden Prairie, MN: Heartland Samplers, Inc., 1990), 7.12.



     
Loading...