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Attn: MAC USERS

Discussion in 'Tech, Gadgets & Science Forum' started by Michael Paul, May 11, 2011.

  1. Michael Paul

    Michael Paul Verified User

    #1
    May 11, 2011
    Joined: Nov 2, 2010
    Messages: 345
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    Antivirus Faceoff: A Non-Alarmist’s Guide to Mac Malware Protection


    [​IMG] Matthew Rogers — The vast majority of Mac users do absolutely nothing to prevent malware or viruses from infecting their systems, and very few of them have experienced anything that would make them think twice about it. The fact is, however, that Mac malware does exist, and there are tools available to ensure that your Mac is as safe as possible from emerging threats.
    Apple itself is straightforward about the fact that OS X isn't impervious to attack. If you go looking, you can find this bit of instruction:
    Run an antivirus program if you find any suspicious files or applications, or if you notice any suspicious behavior on your computer. - Apple Support
    The argument that OS X is inherently secure enough to dodge nasty things isn't untrue, it's just incomplete. Snow Leopard does have its own built-in malware detection service, but it's usually months behind the databases provided by security firms like Sophos. OS X is a UNIX system, so it's very strict about file permissions and user accounts, but malware doesn't need an administrator account to steal your personal information.
    You don't have to be "cruising the red-light district" of the internet to be at risk, either. Take the MacDefender problem as an example. MacDefender, along with variants MacSecurity and MacProtector, is malware that tricks users by looking like it's actually an anti-malware app, and it usually shows up when a poisoned image or link is clicked in an otherwise innocent list of search results. The same trick is often used for fake utility apps like movie players or download managers.
    While it's true that Windows is and always has been the primary target for malware, it really comes down to market share. Apple's rise in popularity over the last few years can only be called meteoric, so the days of feeling safe just because nobody makes malware for Macs are numbered.
    Does that mean you're likely to get infected with something today? Not likely. Mac users can probably keep doing nothing for a couple of years before change is forced on them, but there's no reason to sit back and wait for it. Whether its spyware, viruses or trojans, there are tools available. So, let's take a look at a few of the best options available today that can help protect your Mac.
    Little Snitch

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    Little Snitch isn't technically an antivirus or anti-malware app. It's a service that runs in the background as an interactive firewall. Any app that tries to communicate with another system, whether it's over the network or on the other side of the planet, has to go through Little Snitch. The first time an app tries to make a connection, Little Snitch pops up a request box, and you can choose to allow the connection or have it blocked. You also choose whether you want that choice to be temporary or permanent, and you can alter the "rules" you make at any time. Little Snitch also has a small status window that shows you exactly what's communicating with the outside world at all times, and it shows you where the data is being sent. You can try Little Snitch for a short period, but it's well worth the $29.99 price point. [Little Snitch] Sophos Free Antivirus for Mac

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    Sophos is one of the most trusted authorities on malware and viruses in the industry, and their free offering for OS X is well worth the download if you're feeling insecure. It's extremely user-friendly and never tries to push you to "upgrade" to a paid version. It comes with its own uninstaller (which is actually rare) and it can scan networked drives (which is even rarer). While you're using your Mac, it constantly scans in the background for viruses and known malware threats, along with any suspicious signs of unknown malware threats. It doesn't put a noticeable dent on your system's performance, and Sophos is extremely quick to react to emerging threats (which means you'll always have up-to-date protection). Best of all, of course, is the fact that it's all free. [Sophos] ClamXav

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    ClamXav (Clam Antivirus for OS X) can look daunting to more inexperienced users, but it's actually pretty simple and very powerful for the tiny footprint it has. It puts nearly no drain on your system while running in the background, and you're able to pre-define what folders or drives are scanned in real-time. Virus/threat definitions are updated on a daily basis, and the user always maintains control because everything ClamXav does can be monitored. Whether you're running a system-wide scan, or just running ClamXav in the background, you can actually sit and watch the log file to see each and every file as its scanned. ClamXav is open source and free. [ClamXav] MacScan

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    MacScan isn't a normal antivirus/anti-malware app. Instead of running in the background, MacScan is meant to be run by the user, then closed when finished. It scans the system for all sorts of malware, but it differs from others by specifically targeting cookies. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but it can get pretty annoying when your anti-malware scanner pops up with 27 alerts because of cookies picked up at major web sites. On the other hand, it can be very useful for users who want to rid their system of every last "tracking" cookie. The problem is that MacScan pushes very hard to get you to upgrade to the full version, and because of that, the free version is all but crippled. If you were to purchase the full version, it would cost you $29.99. [MacScan] ESET Cybersecurity for Mac

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    ESET, like Sophos, is a major player in the antivirus/anti-malware industry, and their Mac offering is extremely sleek. It's not all looks, either; ESET Cybersecurity is the total package. User control is a big selling point for the app, beginning with the installation options. It's got a surprisingly small footprint, so it doesn't slow down your system while running in the background, and it's extremely user-friendly. ESET's threat database can update daily, or every hour—it's your choice. The sleek interface, ease of use, scanning speed, and control options are all major pluses for the app, but ESET's effectiveness is what really makes it worth a yearly fee. It consistently scores higher than most other antivirus apps in third-party tests. A single year's license will cost you $39.99, but you can try it free (full-featured) for 30 days. [ESET] Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Mac

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    Kaspersky's offering for Mac is very full-featured and user-friendly, like ESET, but differs in that it has fairly high system drain compared to other apps on the list, and includes link-checking extensions for Chrome, Safari, and Firefox. The main interface looks simple, but it's got very granular controls in its preferences. A year's subscription for Kaspersky Anti-Virus for Mac costs $39.99, but you can try it free for 30 days. [Kaspersky Labs] Others

    iAntiVirus and VirusBarrier Express are both simplistic options for Mac users, but neither does anything special, or better than even a free offering like Sophos. VirusBarrier Express is especially known now for dumping features in an attempt to force users to upgrade to the paid VirusBarrier Plus, which still offers nothing that would place it above alternatives.
    When it comes down to it, you should always use a free trial and evaluate whatever choice you make, and see for yourself whether it's a good fit for the way you use your system. Don't feel pressured to use an expensive solution, either. The risk of malware striking Mac users may be higher now than in previous years, but it's still a low risk. If nothing else, you can help Windows-using friends by catching potential threats to them.
     
  2. i411

    i411 JF-Expert Member

    #2
    May 12, 2011
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
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    Hizi companies wanataka ela tuu za haraka haraka ndo maana wa push hii agenda ya antivirus or anti-malware. mimi natumia mac and all my time kutumia hii os for over 3years now sijawahi kupata virus and being guy who like technology stuff i do go to many sites online and forums and never caught a bug. also i never think of any virus or malware so if anything when pop up on my mac with message like that to me I will close it at once because i know its very had to get bugs on osx unless the same problem repeat itself many times. so i think only windows are likely to be infected with malware because any one on windows knows when antivirus window pops up they have to click up date or scan some thing like that for most normal users, it can even be difficult even for expertise to pic some of these malware s. all this is because windows requre constant antivirus and get constant attack which make everyone on windows use the os @ their own risk. @ mac we are sure we have no bugs we never even get antiviruses warnings so if the pop up we will just close them and you don't need to be an expert to know its a scam
     
  3. Mpogoro

    Mpogoro JF-Expert Member

    #3
    May 12, 2011
    Joined: Dec 7, 2008
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    Labda kukuasaidia tu,licha ya kuwa umekuwa unatumia OS X kwa zaidi ya miaka mitatu bila anti-virus haina maana kuwa hakuna viruses wanaosumbua OS kama OS X au Linux.Tofauti ni kuwa kwa kuwa OS X imekuwa build toka kwenye distro ya Linux mara inahitaji privileges kama application yeyote haija-run.Yaani kama Linux distros nyingi itakuomba username and password za admin kitu ambacho Windows huwa haifanyi hasa unapo-run kama admin na hivyo unakuwa kwenye nafasi kubwa ya ku-install au malwares kuji-install zenyewe.

    Na kwa watu wa Windows unaweza kuwe kwenye safe zaidi kama uta-login na kutumia account kama ya guest wakati wa ku-surf kwasababu mara nyingi haina privileges zinazoweza kuruhusu installation au running ya any .exe file kwa hiyo kwa kiasi kikubwa unaweza uka-avoid viruses hasa kama wewe ni mtu wa kukamua ma-pages kedede kwenye mtandao.Hata hivyo bado utahitaji anti-virus!
     
  4. i411

    i411 JF-Expert Member

    #4
    May 12, 2011
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
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    Virus wapo kwo OSX lakini ni very few ndo maana miaka yote niliyo hama windows os sijawahi kupata viruses na my computer inafanya kazi 90% kama nilivyo inunua. Sina mpango wa kununua antivirus for my mac, sioni haja labda niwe na vita na CIA
     
  5. Wa Ndima

    Wa Ndima JF-Expert Member

    #5
    May 12, 2011
    Joined: Aug 13, 2010
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    Mi toka 2001 natumia osx tangu G3 hadi sasa nina G5 sijawahi kukutana na virus kwenye Mac yangu. Mara moja ishawahi kuniletea kialama cha kuuliza kwa sababu nilimpa atumie mtu asiyeijua vyema nadhani alirename file ya system nikatumia Disk Warrior kurebuild mpaka leo napeta tu sina haja na antivirus. Na hii ndo sababu naipenda apple sina haja na Pumbavu Computers (PC)
     
  6. i411

    i411 JF-Expert Member

    #6
    May 12, 2011
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
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    hawa wanataka kutuuzia ma antivirus tuu na hatuitaji kwa OSX
     
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