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ATCL: Another Richmond!

Discussion in 'Jamii Intelligence' started by Dua, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. Dua

    Dua JF-Expert Member

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    halafu angalia hapa

    if the hiring is as above then another richmond saga on the making a cool 40,000 usd a month on some peoples pockets.

    Ndivyo nchi inavyoliwa na wenye meno makali
     
  2. S

    S. S. Phares JF-Expert Member

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    I hope there is a market for these 2 planes...because these people are very quikly to come up with great ideas that doom to fail when the money comes for the Gov.

    Our econoly is on the UP and if there is a GENUINE MARKET to accomodate some extra 2 737, why lease the planes instead of taking flashy new ones from Boeng???
     
  3. M

    Mkandara Verified User

    #3
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    Dua,
    Baaabu kubwa umeileta hii issue kabla haijafagiwa chini ya uvungu!.
    Halali mtu hapa... Haya wabunge wa Chadema mnasikia hayo!...
     
  4. G

    Game Theory JF-Expert Member

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    nasikia kichefu chefu
     
  5. m

    mTz JF-Expert Member

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    Hiyo ndio bongo wazee, maisha bora ni ndoto kwa mwendo huu!
     
  6. Lunyungu

    Lunyungu JF-Expert Member

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    Hii issue iko kimya sana sana . Sijajua kama ni data hakuna ama watu wamekuwa caught by surprise sasa wanajiuliza ?
     
  7. T

    Tabasamu Senior Member

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    Hapa ndipo huwa nabaki mdomo wazi. Yaani suala la nchi tangu lini limekuwa la CHADEMA? Tuseme CHADEMA wanameguswa na hili ndio, kama ambavyo la radar, ndege ya rais na migodi na wakatoa hoja zao zitasaidia nini wakati bunge letu ni la CCM?
     
  8. M

    Mwanagenzi JF-Expert Member

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    Jan 4, 2007
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    Wameanza kujitokeza kujibu tuhuma na maswali yetu!

    ATCL leased aircraft ok, says official
    DAILY NEWS Reporter
    Daily News; Thursday,January 04, 2007

    AN aircraft Boeing 737, which was recently acquired by the Air Tanzania Corporation (ATCL) has started operations and is doing well, an official with the airline told the 'Daily News' in Dar es Salaam yesterday.

    "The plane arrived on Wednesday last week and started operations on Saturday," ATCL Public Relations Officer Alphonce Mgeninji said in an interview.

    The ATCL management has earlier described the arrival of the aircraft as a new dawn for the troubled firm to move out of the red.

    The national airline has dry-leased two aircrafts from Celtic Corporation based in Canada for 50,000 US dollars a month for each on a twoyear contract. The second aircraft is expected in the country within a month.

    The two planes were part of the fleet transition from those owned by the South African Airways (SAA). Mr Mgeninji said hiring of the aircraft followed the decision of the government to recapitalise ATCL following misunderstandings with the firm's strategic partner - SAA.
     
  9. Mzee Mwanakijiji

    Mzee Mwanakijiji Platinum Member

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    Jan 4, 2007
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    When was the tender for the leasing of Aircraft announced? Does anyone know that Boeing 737-200 Family is the most accident prone passenger aircraft? What is the full name of the company, where is it registered, chartered, or incorporated. I'm tired watu wanatuambia "Kampuni ya Kimarekani, oh.. Kampuni toka Kanada" Where on earth are these companies!! A major company that doesn't have a functional website in the modern IT world...has to raise nyusi zetu!!

    In the past 30 years or so the following are accidents that involved a Boeing 737 (most of them 200 series). Why did we choose this aircraft, I have no idea! I'm quite sure it doesn't come with bumper to bumper warranty! It was for this reason that Indonesia in May last year banned the importations of Boeing 737-200 by its airlines! read: http://www.forbes.com/markets/feeds/afx/2006/05/10/afx2737462.html

    The accidents: where did I get them.. you can easily search the internet!!

    5 July 1972; Pacific Southwest 737-200; San Francisco, CA: The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Sacramento to San Francisco when shortly before landing it was hijacked by two armed men who intended to have the aircraft fly to the Soviet Union. After landing in San Francisco, the aircraft was directed to an isolated part of the airport while the hijackers negotiated with authorities. Later, an armed FBI agent posing as the pilot that would fly the aircraft to the Soviet Union entered the aircraft while, unknown to the hijackers, three other armed FBI agents were able to position themselves near the front entry door. As the three outside FBI agents began to climb the stairs to enter the aircraft, a gun battle broke out which resulted in the deaths of both of the hijackers and one of the 77 passengers. Two other passengers were wounded, but survived. None of the seven crew members were injured.

    8 December 1972; United Airlines 737-200; Midway Airport, Chicago: The aircraft crashed during approach. Three of the six crew and 40 of the 55 passengers were killed.


    31 May 1973; Indian Airlines 737-200; near New Dehli, India: The aircraft crashed and caught fire during landing. The crash killed five of the seven crew members and 43 of the 58 passengers.


    4 December 1977; Malaysian Airline System 737-200; near Johore Strait, Malaysia: The aircraft was hijacked and subsequently destroyed by an in flight explosion. All seven crew members and 93 passengers were killed.


    11 February 1978; Pacific Western Airlines 737-200; Cranbrook Airport, Canada: The aircraft crashed after thrust reversers did not fully stow following a rejected landing that was executed in order to avoid a snowplow. The crash killed four of the crew members and 38 of the 44 passengers.


    10 May 1980; Indian Airlines 737-200; near Rampur Hat, India: The aircraft experienced severe en route turbulence. Two of the 132 passengers were killed.


    22 August 1981; Far Eastern Air Transport 737-200; near Sanyi, Taiwan: The aircraft experienced in flight structural failure. The crash killed all six crew members and 104 passengers.


    13 January 1982; Air Florida 737-200; Washington, DC:. The crew did not activate heaters on engine sensors during icing conditions. The crew subsequently did not adjust the engines to allow sufficient thrust for takeoff and the aircraft stalled and crashed into the frozen Potomac River. The crash killed four of the five crew members and 70 of the 74 passengers.


    25 May 1982; VASP 737-200; Brasilia, Brazil: The aircraft had a hard landing in a rainstorm and broke in two. The crash killed two of the 112 passengers.


    11 July 1983; TAME 737-200; near Cuenca, Ecuador: The aircraft hit high ground during approach. The crash killed all eight crew members and 111 passengers.


    23 September 1983; Gulf Air 737-200; Mino Jobel Ali, near Abu Dhabi, UAE: Crashed during approach after a bomb had exploded in the baggage compartment. The crash killed all six crew members and 105 of 111 passengers.


    8 November 1983; TAAG Angola Airlines 737-200; Lubango, Angola: The aircraft crashed 900 meters short of the runway. The crash killed all five crew members and 121 of 126 passengers.


    30 August 1984; Cameroon Airlines 737-200; Douala, Cameroon: While on the ground, one of the engines had an uncontained failure which ruptured a fuel tank and started fire. Two of the 108 passengers were killed.


    15 April 1985; Thai Airways 737-200; Phuket, Thailand: The aircraft hit high ground in darkness and was destroyed by the impact and subsequent fire. The crash killed all four passengers and seven crew members.


    22 August 1985; British Airtours 737-200; Manchester Airport, England: The crew rejected the takeoff due to an uncontained engine failure. The failure led to a punctured fuel tank and a fire that spread to the cabin. The accident killed 53 of 131 passengers and two of six crew members.


    23 November 1985; Egyptair 737-200; Valletta, Malta: The aircraft was hijacked to Malta. After several hours of negotiations, Egyptian troops stormed the aircraft. During the ensuing battle, the hijackers threw several hand grenades. The aircraft was severely damaged by the explosions and fire. Two of the six crew members and 58 of the 90 passengers were killed.


    28 January 1986; VASP 737-200; Sao Paulo, Brazil: The crew attempted to fly in bad weather and rejected the takeoff . One of the 60 passengers and none of the four crew members were killed.


    16 February 1986; China Airlines 737-200; Pescadores Islands, Taiwan: The aircraft touched down on the runway but crashed during an attempted go around . All six passengers and seven crew members were killed.


    25 December 1986; Iraqi Airways 737-200; Over Saudi Arabia: The aircraft was en route between Iraq and Jordan when hijackers set off grenades and started a gunfight with security forces on board the aircraft. The aircraft crashed near Arar Saudi Arabia, killing 67 of the 107 passengers.


    4 August 1987; LAN Chile 737-200; Calama, Chile: The gear failed during landing and the aircraft broke in two and caught fire. One of the 27 passengers were killed.


    31 August 1987; Thai Airways 737-200; Phuket, Thailand: While descending during a daylight approach in good weather, the crew lost control of the aircraft and crashed into sea, apparently due to a combination of errors by the flight crew and air traffic control. All of the nine crew members and 74 passengers were killed.


    4 January 1988; Condor 737-200; Izmir, Turkey: The aircraft hit high ground on approach. All five crew members and 11 passengers were killed.

    28 April 1988; Aloha 737-200; near Maui, HI: The aircraft had an explosive decompression due to metal fatigue in upper cabin area. The crew was able to execute a successful emergency landing with a significant portion of the upper fuselage missing. One of the five crew members was killed.
    Note: Even though no passengers were killed and therefore not a fatal airline event, this mishap is included in this list because of the effect it had on air safety practices. As a result of this accident, there were a number of regulatory changes involving inspection requirements for older aircraft such as the one involved in this event.


    15 September 1988; Ethiopian Airlines 737-200; Bahar Dar, Ethiopia: During takeoff, the aircraft ingested numerous pigeons into both engines. One engine lost thrust almost immediately and the second lost thrust during the emergency return to the airport. As a result of the crash landing, 31 of the 105 passengers were killed.


    19 October 1988; Indian Airlines 737-200; Ahmedabad, India: The aircraft hit an electric mast five miles (eight km)out on approach in poor visibility. All six crew members and 124 of 129 passengers were killed.


    8 January 1989; British Midland Airways 737-400; near East Midlands Airport, UK: A fan blade failure at top of climb damaged one engine and the crew mistakenly performed a precautionary engine shutdown on the wrong engine. The damaged engine lost power shortly before landing and the flight crew was unable to restart the good engine prior to striking the ground. 47 of the 118 passengers were killed.
    9 March 1989; Piedmont 737-200; near Dayton, OH: The aircraft lost cabin pressurization at 31,000 feet (9450 meters). The aircraft executed an emergency descent and landed at Dayton, OH. One of the 70 passengers was taken from the plane to a local hospital and died less than seven hours later. Note: The local medical authorities declared the death due to natural causes. The NTSB also lists this event as an incident and not a fatal accident.


    3 September 1989; Varig 737-200; near Sao Jose do Xingu, Brazil: The aircraft had been on a domestic flight from Marabà to Belem Bélem when the crew made a forced landing due to fuel exhaustion. The flight crew had inadvertently entered a 27 degree heading into the flight computer rather than the correct heading value of 270 degrees. By the time the crew had discovered the error, the aircraft was too far away from a suitable landing option. Twelve of the 48 passengers were killed in the emergency landing. The six crew members all survived. The survivors were found about two days later.


    20 September 1989; USAir 737-400; La Guardia Airport, New York: The crew incorrectly trimmed the rudder for takeoff and were forced to abort the takeoff. The aircraft overran the runway and was partially submerged in water. Two of the 55 passengers were killed.


    26 October 1989; China Airlines 737-200; near Hualien, Taiwan: The crew was using an incorrect departure procedure and hit cloud shrouded high ground at 7000 feet (2130 meters). All seven crew members and 49 passengers were killed.


    11 May 1990; Philippine Airlines 737-300; Manila, Philippines: While the aircraft was taxiing, one of the fuel tanks exploded. Eight of the 113 passengers were killed.


    2 October 1990; Xiamen Airlines 737-200; Guangzhou, China: Hijacker detonated bomb during approach, causing the 737 to hit parked 757 on the ground. Seven of the nine crew members and 75 of the 93 passengers were killed.
     
  10. Mzee Mwanakijiji

    Mzee Mwanakijiji Platinum Member

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    Jan 4, 2007
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    1 February 1991; USAir 737-300; Los Angeles, CA: The USAir flight was cleared to land on a runway which also had a Skywest Metro III on the runway awaiting takeoff. The aircraft collided and burst into flames. Two of the six crew members and 20 of the 83 passengers on the USAir jet were killed. All 10 passengers and two crew members on the Metro III were killed.


    3 March 1991; United Airlines 737-200; near Colorado Springs, CO: The aircraft departed from controlled flight and crashed during its approach. The NTSB has not yet determined the cause of this accident. All five crew members and 20 passengers were killed.
    NTSB Accident Summary
    NTSB Accident Report


    16 August 1991; Indian Airlines 737-200; near Imphal, India: The aircraft hit high ground during descent about 30 km from the airport. All six crew members and 63 passengers were killed.


    6 June 1992; COPA Panama 737-200; near Ticuti, Panama: Aircraft was in cruise when it went into an uncontrolled high speed dive and broke up several thousand feet above the ground. All seven crew members and 40 passengers were killed.


    24 November 1992; China Southern Airlines 737-300; Guangzhou, China: Aircraft hit high ground during approach. All eight crew members and 133 passengers were killed.


    26 April 1993; Indian Airlines 737-200; Aurangabad, India: The flight crew initiated their liftoff late and the aircraft struck a large vehicle on a road just outside the airport. The vehicle strike damaged one engine and the aircraft later hit power lines and crashed. Four of the six crew members and 52 of the 112 passengers were killed. The administrators of the airport were also cited for failing to regulate traffic on that same road.


    26 July 1993; Asiana Airlines 737-500; near Mokpo, Korea: The aircraft struck high ground in poor weather about 4 km from the runway while it was making its third attempt at a landing. Four of the six crew members and 64 of the 104 passengers were killed.


    8 September 1994; USAir 737-300; near Pittsburgh, PA: The aircraft lost control at about 6,000 feet (1830 meters) during approach. All five crew members and 127 passengers were killed.

    29 December 1994; THY Turkish Airlines 737-400; near Van, Turkey: The aircraft hit a hill four km from the airport during the plane's fourth landing attempt. Six of the seven crew members and 49 of the 55 passengers were killed


    9 August 1995; Aviateca 737-200; near San Salvador, El Salvador: The aircraft struck a volcano at night in heavy rain and thunderstorms. All seven crew members and 58 passengers were killed

    13 November 1995; Nigeria Airways 737-200; Kaduna, Nigeria: The aircraft touched down about halfway down the runway and eventually departed the runway off to one side. The aircraft was subsequently destroyed by fire. Nine of the 129 passengers were killed. The event happened in daylight and the runway was dry.

    3 December 1995; Cameroon Airlines 737-200; Douala, Cameroon: The aircraft was on a flight from Cotonou, Benin and crashed in darkness about three miles (4.8 km) short of the runway in a swamp. The crew members reportedly aborted the first landing attempt and they were on their second approach when the accident occurred. Four of the six crew members and 68 of the 72 passengers were killed.

    29 February 1996; Faucett Airlines 737-200; Arequipa, Peru: The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic night flight from Lima to Arequipa when it crashed several miles from the airport. All 117 passengers and six crew members were killed.

    2 April 1996; U.S. Air Force 737-T43; near Dubrovnik, Croatia: The aircraft struck mountainous terrain while attempting to land at the airport under conditions of reduced visibility. The flight crew was using an unapproved approach. All six crew members and 29 passengers were killed. Among the passengers were a number of U.S. corporate executives and the U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Ron Brown. The aircraft is a military version of the 737 that was used to transport military and civilian VIPs.
    Note: Although not a fatal airline event, it is included due to the circumstances of the crash.
    Commentary from Dr. Peter Ladkin of the University of Bielefeld

    8 May 1997; China Southern Airlines 737-300; Shenzhen, China: The aircraft landed at night during a heavy rainstorm at Shenzhen-Huangtian airport after a domestic flight from Chongqing. The aircraft apparently broke up and caught fire after it veered off the runway. Early reports indicate that at least two of the nine crew members and 33 of the 65 passengers were killed.


    19 December 1997; SilkAir 737-300; near Palembang, Indonesia: The aircraft crashed in a river about 35 miles (56 km) north of Palembang while en route between Jakarta and Singapore. All seven crew members and 97 passengers were killed.

    5 May 1998; Occidental Petroleum 737-200;near Andoas, Peru: The aircraft crashed near the Andoas airport during a rainstorm after a flight from Iquitos. The aircraft was executing an NDB approach at the time of the accident. Five of the seven crew members and 69 of the 80 passengers were killed.
    Note: The aircraft had been leased by Occidental Petroleum from the Peruvian Air Force in order to ferry its workers to the Andoas area. it is not counted as a fatal event in the 737 rate statistics because the flight was a private charter that was not open to the general public.

    31 August 1999; LAPA 737-200; Buenos Aires, Argentina: The aircraft settled back onto the runway just after takeoff, overran the runway, hit two cars on a nearby road, and caught fire. The crew had continued the takeoff in spite of a configuration alarm. There were 65 fatalities among the 98 passengers and five crew members. Two of the occupants in the cars were also killed.

    19 April 2000; Air Philippines 737-200; near Davao, Philippines: The aircraft crashed on Samal Island near the city of Davao during its second approach to Davao's airport. The aircraft had begun its flight in Manila. All 124 passengers and seven crew members were killed in the crash.

    17 July 2000; Alliance Air 737-200; Patna, India: The aircraft was on a domestic flight from Calcutta to Patna and was making a second approach when the aircraft crashed into a residential area about 2 km (1.25 miles) from the airport. All six crew members and 45 of the 52 passengers were killed. Five people on the ground were also killed.

    11 August 2000; Southwest Airlines 737; en route from Las Vegas, NV to Salt Lake City, UT: The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Las Vegas to Salt Lake City when about 20 minutes before landing, a 19 year old passenger became belligerent and attempted to enter the cockpit. While being escorted back to his seat, the 19 year old attacked another passenger. A number of other passengers subdued him until the aircraft landed. After landing, the now unconscious passenger was removed from the aircraft and he died several hours later. The medical examiner found traces of drugs in the dead passenger's system, but listed the cause of death as suffocation. The death was classified as a homicide, but none of the passengers involved in the incident were charged with a crime. No other crew members or passengers were seriously injured or killed. Because this passenger death was due at least in part to the deliberate actions of that passenger, this does not constitute a fatal event as defined by AirSafe.com.

    7 May 2002; EgyptAir 737-500; near Tunis, Tunisia: The aircraft crashed about 6 km (3.8 mi) from the airport after a flight from Cairo. The aircraft was reportedly making a second approach for landing when it crashed into high ground during a period of reduced visibility due to fog and sandstorms. Three of the six crew members and 11 of the 56 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the Middle East and Africa
    Fatal Events for EgyptAir

    .
     
  11. Mzee Mwanakijiji

    Mzee Mwanakijiji Platinum Member

    #11
    Jan 4, 2007
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    6 March 2003; Air Algérie 737-200; near Tamanrasset, Algeria: The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff on a domestic flight from Tamanrasset to Ghardaia. One of the engines reportedly caught fire during takeoff. Five of the six crew members and all 97 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events with a sole survivor
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the Middle East and Africa

    15 March 2003; Air China 737-300; en route Hong Kong to Beijing: In the 18 December 2003 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors of a study concluded that five people who died from SARS most likely contracted the disease after exposure to an infected passenger during a three-hour flight from Hong Kong to Beijing. The 72-year-old male passenger who had SARS symptoms when he boarded the flight in Hong Kong was hospitalized after arrival in Beijing and died five days later.

    Investigations in Singapore, Hong Kong, China, and Taiwan revealed that a total of 20 passengers and two flight attendant contracted SARS due to their exposure on that flight. The 20 passengers and one flight attendant were in the economy section of the aircraft and the other fight attendant was in the first class section. There was a total of 112 passengers and eight crew members on the flight.

    One of those 20 infected passengers, one of the five from that flight that eventually died, infected a passenger on a Bangkok to Beijing flight on 23 March 2003 and caused two passengers on that flight to become infected. One of the two infected passengers on the Thai Air flight also died.

    Sources:
    1. Olsen, S.J., Chang, H., Cheung, T.Y., et al, "Transmission of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome on Aircraft," New England Journal of Medicine, 349(25):2416-2422, 18 December 2003.
    2. Lakshmanan, I.A.R, "Air China Flight 112: Tracking the Genesis of a Plague," Boston Globe, 18 May 2003, sec. 1A, p. 1.

    737-200C; near Port Sudan, Sudan: The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff on a domestic flight from Port Sudan to Khartoum. The flight crew reported technical difficulties shortly after takeoff and the aircraft crashed about three miles (five km) from the airport.. All 11 crew members and 105 of the 106 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events with a sole survivor
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the Middle East and Africa


    3 January 2004; Flash Airlines 737-300; near Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt: The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff on a domestic flight to Cairo and crashed into the Red Sea about nine miles (15 km) south of the city. All 135 passengers and 13 crew members were killed. Flash Airlines is a charter operator based in Egypt.
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the Middle East and Africa

    3 February 2005; Kam Air 737-200; near Kabul, Afghanistan: The aircraft was approaching Kabul on a domestic flight from Herat when it crashed in mountainous terrain about 20 miles (32 km) from its destination. The aircraft was scheduled domestic flight from Herat to Kabul and was diverted from landing at Kabul due to the effects of a severe snowstorm. The crew had sought clearance to land in Peshawar, Pakistan prior to losing contact with air traffic control. All eight crew members and 96 passengers were killed. Although this was a domestic flight within Afghanistan, the airline was based in Kyrgyzstan.
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the Middle East and Africa
    Fatal Events for Airlines of the former Soviet Union


    14 August 2005; Helios Airways 737-300; Grammatikos, Greece: The aircraft was on an international flight from Larnaca, Cyprus to Athens, Greece. Air traffic control lost contact with the airliner shortly after the crew reported an air conditioning problem. Greek F-16 aircraft were sent to intercept the airliner and reportedly observed at least one person who was not a flight crew member inside of the cockpit. The first officer appeared to be unconscious and the captain was not seen in the cockpit. The aircraft appeared to have run out of fuel and crashed in a mountainous area about 25 miles (40 km) from Athens. All six crew members and 115 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events for Airlines from Europe


    23 August 2005; Transportes Aéreos Nacionales de la Selva (TANS) 737-200; Pulcallpa, Peru: The aircraft was on a domestic flight from Lima to Pulcallpa when the aircraft encountered severe weather conditions. The aircraft caught fire after crashing and breaking up in a swampy area about three miles (4.8 km) from the Pulcallpa airport.shortly after takeoff, hitting several houses in a residential area about half a kilometer from the runway. Four of the six crew members and 35 of the 92 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events for Airlines from Latin America and the Caribbean


    5 September 2005; Mandala Airlines 737-200; Medan, Indonesia: The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff, hitting several houses in a residential area about half a kilometer from the runway. The aircraft was on a domestic flight from Medan to Jakarta. All five crew members and 97 of the 112 passengers were killed. About 47 people on the ground were also killed.
    Fatal Events for Airlines of Asia


    22 October 2005; Bellview Airlines 737-200; near Lissa, Nigeria: The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic flight from Lagos to Abuja and air traffic control lost contact with the aircraft about five minutes after takeoff. The aircraft crashed about 30 miles (48 km) from Lagos near the town of Lissa. All six crew members and 111 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Events for Airlines from Africa and the Middle East

    8 December 2005; Southwest Airlines 737-700; Chicago, IL: The aircraft was on a scheduled flight from Baltimore to Chicago's Midway Airport. After landing, the crew was unable to stop the aircraft on the runway, going off the runway, through the airport's barrier fence and onto a nearby street. At some point during this event, the nose wheel collapsed. The aircraft struck at least two vehicles, with the impact causing fatal injuries to a six year old boy who was a passenger in one of the vehicles. None of the five crew members or 95 passengers were seriously injured. This was the first serious accident involving the 737-700. Because this event did not cause a passenger fatality, it is not counted as a fatal event as defined by AirSafe.com.


    29 September 2006; Gol Linhas Aereas 737-800; near Peixoto de Azevedo, Brazil:
    The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic flight from Manaus to Brasilia when it had a midair collision in the area of São Félix do Xingu with an Embraer ERJ135 Legacy 600 executive jet operated by ExcelAire. The ExcelAire Legacy 600 jet had been on a flight from São José dos Campos to Manaus. After the collision, which damaged the left wing, left stabilizer, and left elevator of the executive jet, the crew of the damaged ExcelAire aircraft was able to land at a nearby military airfield at Cachimbo, Brazil. The 737 subsequently experienced an inflight breakup and crashed 30 about kilometers (19 miles) north of the Peixoto de Azevedo municipality. The Legacy 600 was on the first leg of a delivery flight to the U.S. The 737 aircraft was also relatively new, having come into service with the airline less than three weeks before the crash.

    All six crew members and 148 passengers on the 737 were killed. The two crew members and five passengers on the Legacy 600 were not injured.

    29 October 2006; ADC 737-200; Abuja, Nigeria: The aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff on a scheduled domestic flight from Abuja to Sokoto. There was a storm in the area at the time of the crash. Four of the five crew members and 96 of the 105 passengers were killed.

    1 January 2007; Adam Air 737-400; near Polewali, Indonesia : Air traffic control lost contact with the aircraft while it was at cruising altitude about halfway into its scheduled two-hour flight from Surabaya to Manado. The aircraft carried six crew members and 96 passengers
     
  12. O

    Ogah JF-Expert Member

    #12
    Jan 4, 2007
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    next!!.......................

    Kwa maana hii, soko la ATCL liko mashakani.................duhh hii ni back to square one!!.
     
  13. Wambandwa

    Wambandwa JF-Expert Member

    #13
    Jan 4, 2007
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    But I remember to had read somewhere in our local daily news papers that the Chairman of ATCL board of directors - Mr. Mufuruki, reported that the airline was planning to acquire ( lease)? two jumbo jets - 747 family - that'll require to have have our pilots retrained because there are none having ratings in their log books to fly such planes! But, that reported - no 'DRY LEASE TENDER' has ever been floated! Another misconduct in procurement procedures.
    INSTEAD it's B737-200 dry leased.
    The worst is the quoted lease cost per month! One mwanabodi here has indicated the lease cost to be as low as US$ 30,000 @ month while the the airline's PRS confirmed the lease to cost them 50,000 @ month for two solid years...
    YET Mzee Mwanakijiji has given the long shocking accident records of B737-200 , the very same plane our dear ATCL has leased....

    EBU TUFIKIRIE TAKURU (PCB) IMEAMRIWA ISIINGILIWE NA MTU YEYOTE WAKATI HAIWEZI KUMFANYA MTU KITU CHOCHOTE

    Bila woga kama CEO wa nchi anachosema kinaingilkia sikio hili na kutokea sikio jingine au wakijua kabisa hana ubavu wa kuwafabya kitu..

    AIBU ZAIDI WANASOMA JAMBO FORUMS NA KUIKEBEHI KWAMBA DEBE TUPU...

    THERE MUST SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE WITH GUTS TO INITIATE SUCH A BOGUS BUSINESS DEAL / TRANSACTION!!
     
  14. K

    Kulikoni JF-Expert Member

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    Jan 4, 2007
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    Ukiumwa na nyoka basi hata ujani ukikugusa unastuka. Baada ya Richmond, leasing ya hizi ndege imesharaise suspicions.

    Instead of making hasty conclusions that the deal is bogus, nimezungumza na mtaalamu mmoja wa haya masuala huku ughaibuni kupata maoni yake. Yeye ameshangazwa kuwa hiyo lease fee ni NDOGO mno, yaani kama hakuna catch somewhere, basi leasing at $50K per month can't be better.

    According to mtaalamu wangu, kawaida B737 hufanya kazi kwa wastani wa masaa kumi kwa siku. Kwa hesabu za haraka haraka, tunalipia only about $167 kwa saa! Sasa Ukichukua mfano wa nauli ya Dar- Kia - Dar, $167 ni kama nauli ya mtu mmoja tu, au haifiki watu wawili! Kwa ruti hiyo, masaa kumi yanakupatia 4 round trips. Assuming ndege itasafiri with 80% of the seats occupied (out of the 102 seats), ina maana watabeba kama abiria 325 (return trips) au abiria 650 (one way) kwa siku, na katika hawa .. ni nauli ya kama watu 10 tu hivi imeshakulipia lease ya ndege nzima!

    If the planes are in good order, someone has done a very good job. Yaani ukipata dili kama hilo, hata kutangaza tenda ni kupoteza muda! (ikiwa taratibu za ATCL zinaruhusu kuto-tender)

    What is the catch?
    Hatuna data za kutosha kwa hiyo all we can do is speculate as usual, kama walivyofanya baadhi hapo juu.

    Mtaalamu wangu was concerned that 19 year old B737 aircraft, kama haijafly muda mrefu na kama haijakuwa well maintained, itakuwa very costly. Matengenezo yake yanaweza kufikia mpaka $1M!! ... which will also come with lengthy downtime during maintanance [leading to loss of revenue and loss/death of goodwill and confidence level from customers].

    Katika discussion yetu sikuwahi kutaja kuwa ni 200 series, as sikujua by then. So there was no indication of these pieces being 'the most accident prone passenger aircraft'!. Hata hivyo, he did say that some of these B737 are not allowed to fly in some countries due to unacceptable levels of noise and gas emissions.

    Kwa hiyo kama hatujapewa hizi ndege kwa ajili tu ya kuclear store za hao jamaa wa canada, basi ni dili zuri. Otherwise ndio hivyo tena!
     
  15. Lunyungu

    Lunyungu JF-Expert Member

    #15
    Jan 4, 2007
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    Duh!! Kichwa kinauma sana . JK inusuru TZ yangu
     
  16. M

    Mkandara Verified User

    #16
    Jan 4, 2007
    Joined: Mar 3, 2006
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    Kulikoni,
    Hayo mahesabu yako mshikaji yameniacha hoi!...
    Kama kweli ingekuwa tunapiga mahesabu hivyo basi hakuna mtu angenunua gari bali kukodisha...
    Kumbuka hata kukodisha gari tu kwa ajili ya biashara gharama zake huonekana ndogo sana, mathaln dollar 75 kwa siku, lakini unapoanza biashara yenyewe ndipo hapo utaiona kuwa hizo dollar 75 zinakurudisha nyuma. Kisha kuna kipengele cha gari liwe ktk hali uliyoichukua laa sivyo gharama nyingine.
    Kifupi kuweza kumudu costs za ndege kwa mwezi inaweza kuwama mara tatu ya gharama za kukodisha.
    Tuliweza vipi kununua ndege za kwanza chini ya Ujamaa, tushindwe leo hali uchumi wetu unasemakana kuwa ni mzuri zaidi?..Kwani ndege mpya kama hizo ama 767 zinauzwa kiasi gani?
     
  17. M

    Mkandara Verified User

    #17
    Jan 4, 2007
    Joined: Mar 3, 2006
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    Kulikoni,
    Hayo mahesabu yako mshikaji yameniacha hoi!...
    Kama kweli ingekuwa tunapiga mahesabu hivyo basi hakuna mtu angenunua gari bali sote tungekuwa tunakodisha...
    Kumbuka hata kukodisha gari tu kwa ajili ya biashara gharama zake huonekana ndogo sana, kwa mfano dollar 75 kwa siku, lakini unapoanza biashara yenyewe ndipo hapo utaona kuwa hizo dollar 75 zinakurudisha nyuma. Kisha kuna kipengele cha gari liwe ktk hali uliyoichukua laa sivyo gharama nyingine... sio lako!
    Kifupi kuweza kumudu costs za ndege kwa mwezi inaweza kuwama mara tatu ya gharama za kukodisha.
    Tuliweza vipi kununua ndege za kwanza chini ya Ujamaa, tushindwe leo hali uchumi wetu unasemakana kuwa ni mzuri zaidi?..Kwani ndege mpya kama hizo ama 767 zinauzwa kiasi gani?
     
  18. Ole

    Ole JF-Expert Member

    #18
    Jan 4, 2007
    Joined: Dec 16, 2006
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    Huu ni ujinga wa serikali ya Tanzania, Boeng wanauza ndege kwa mkopo, kwa nini serikali haikopi ndege mpya za kisasa. All airlines in the world wananunua ndege kwa kulipa kidogo kidogo nyie mmeamua kukodi MITUMBA ili Richmonduli and Family wapate kitu kidogo.

    mikataba feki kama hii itaendelea hadi pale bunge la Tanzania litakapopitisha sheria ya kuweka limit za mikataba bila kupitiwa na kamati za Bunge. Richmonduli ataendelea kutesa tu, inabidi baba wa taifa afufuke kwani aliwaonya.

    Asiyesikia la mkuu huvunjika guu.
     
  19. K

    Kulikoni JF-Expert Member

    #19
    Jan 4, 2007
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    Mkandara,

    Mahesabu nliyoweka ni as far as leasing is concerned, hawa jamaa wamelease hizi ndege kwa miaka miwili. Na nnavyofahamu ni some sort of quick measure baada ndege yao ya mwisho kuwa grounded for technical reasons, ilhali kuna watu wameshalipia tiketi zao hawajaweza kuzitumia.

    At $50K per month, a 2 years lease fee comes to $1.2M
    Buying a new Boeing B737 will cost you over $40M (Ref: http://www.boeing.com/commercial/prices/). But of course, ikiwa ni ndege yako utaitumia kwa miaka mingi, sio miwili tu.

    Point ya hivyo vimahesabu ni kuonyesha kuwa: IF... a big IF, hizo ndege ziko katika hali nzuri na hatukupewa kwa ajili tu ya kuclear junk yard ya hao jamaa, na hakuna some wierd clauses katika leasing agreement .... basi hili ni dili zuri mno!

    Normal leasing fees ni far more expensive than the $50K/month.

    By the way, Mfano wako kukodisha gari kwa dola 75 kwa siku na kuconclude kuwa eti ni rahisi mno kiasi tusingenunua magari, nauona sio sahihi. $75 per day comes to more than $80K for 3 years alone, whereas you can get a nice new car for that amount, lasting you 5 to 10 years in very good condition. Au hata kama huna lumpsum, ukilipia monthly installments, utalipa less that 25% per month compared to bei hiyo ya $75 per day.
     
  20. K

    Kulikoni JF-Expert Member

    #20
    Jan 4, 2007
    Joined: Aug 28, 2006
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    Mwanakijiji,
    Mbona unataka kuashiria kuwa hii joke nliyoipokea hapo chini inelekea kuwa kweli?

    ________________________________________________________________
    Fly Air Tanzania

    Good morning, Ladies and Gentlemen. This is your captain MAFURU.

    Welcoming both seated and standing passengers on board of Air Tanzania.

    We apologize for the six-hours delay in taking off, it was due to bad weather and some bad traffic from Tegeta to the Airport, Dala Dala's are all full in the morning hours and traffic not moving.

    This is flight 712 to Mwanza. Landing there is not guaranteed, but we will end up somewhere in the Lake Zone. And, if luck is in our favor, we may even be landing on your village!

    Air Tanzania has an excellent safety-record.. In fact, our safety standards are so high, that even pick-pockets, snatcher's and bandits are afraid to fly with us!

    It is with pleasure; I announce that, starting this year, over 30% of our passengers have reached their destination.

    If our engines are too noisy for you, on passenger request, we can arrange to turn them off!

    To make your free fall to earth pleasant and memorable, we serve complimentary KONYAGI and Our favourite local brew MNAZI, you can also get GONGO if you promise not to drink more than half a bottle.

    For our not-so-religious passengers, we are the only airline who can help you find out if there really is a God!

    We regret to inform you, that today's in-flight movie will not be shown as we could not record it from the ITV due to UEFA Champions League live broadcasting. However, we have bought 10 copies of SANI Magazines and 12 copies of NIPASHE to supplement the movie.

    There is no smoking allowed in this airplane. Any smoke you see in the cabin is only the early warning system on the engines telling us to slow down or our sterwards might be making TEA for the cockpit crews including myslef.

    In order to catch important landmarks, we try to fly as close as possible for the best view. If however, we go a little too close, do let us know.

    Our enthusiastic co-pilot sometimes flies right through the landmark!

    Kindly be seated, keep your seat in an upright position for take-off and fasten your seat belt. For those of you who can't find a seat-belt, kindly fasten your own belt to the arm of your seat. And, for those of you who can't find a seat, do not hesitate to get in touch with a stewardess who
    will explain how to fasten yourself on the overhead lockers."

    "Thanking you all for choosing Air-Tanzania to fly for the first and probably the last time."

    _________________________________________________________________

    OK .. back to serious issues!
     
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