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16 apps I'm thankful for

Discussion in 'Tech, Gadgets & Science Forum' started by Invisible, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. Invisible

    Invisible Admin Staff Member

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    Dec 6, 2008
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    [​IMG]

    16. Cabos. I rarely use a Gnutella client any more. When there is the odd song stuck in my head that necessitates a one-off download, Cabos is what I use. It's got a clean, simple interface, and it works - and that's really all I'm after.

    15. Flash Player. Damn you, Adobe. Now that v10 has taken care of some of the CPU and memory issues, it's hard to begrudge Flash. There are just way, way too many addictive little games and excellent web applications that have been built using it.

    14. FastCopy. My boss also runs a DJ business, and transferring his multi-hundred gig library from drive to drive was starting to drive me insane. After stupidly giving Windows a crack at the job once, I quickly hunted down a better tool for the job. FastCopy with the buffer cranked up made (relatively) short work of the task.

    13. Find and Run Robot. It's not quite a flashy as the more popular Launchy, but it's much lighter on resources and gets the job done just as well. There are also tons of great extensions for it. For those who swear by the power of the keyboard, FARR is a must have.

    12. MalwareBytes Anti-malware. My favorite weapon against infested customer computers. If it were fully portable it'd be even better, but since I can install and update it safe mode I'm not too concerned. MalwareBytes scans quickly and does an amazing job at finding and uprooting all kinds of fiendish software.

    11. VirtualBox. In my continuing quest to find one Linux distro that I can finally stick with, VirtualBox is my right-hand app. Now that I've got some decent hardware to virtualize on, I was able to ditch my frankenlaptop and give it a well-deserved rest. I can't even guess how many times I formatted the poor devil's hard drive.

    10. LastPass. I admit it. I was guilty of at least one of my "five ways to surf like a complete moron." I used the same password on just about every site. In my defense, it was very strong. Now, however, I leave the grunt work up to LastPass. I've got one memorable but insanely difficult master password and let it remember my sites for me. It's got a form filler now, too. Who doesn't want to avoid repetitive typing?

    9. ImgBurn. I only started using ImgBurn after seeing it pop up repeatedly in comments on some of my posts. You guys were right - it's a great burning app, and it's doing a fantastic job at backing up my WII games. Being out one $60 disc with no copy is enough for me, thanks.

    8. Skype. When my wife and I were having serious withdrawals while being away from our son for the first time, Skype came to the rescue. Thanks to its excellent video conferencing we were able to hear our son tell us that he didn't miss us at all face to face - and follow it up by telling us to talk to grandma because he was all done.

    7. Chrome. Though I only use it occasionally, I really appreciate its existence. Because of Chrome and the competition over browser share, we're more likely than ever to see great developments in all our favorite web browsing applications.

    6. Photoshop. I really want to love the Gimp, but it still frustrates me from time to time. For example, why does my image not redraw when I crop it? Why is working with type such a pain sometimes? Photoshop is still the grand master of image editing kung fu, and it keeps getting better - CS4 even runs in native mode on my Vista x64 install.

    5. OpenOffice.org. The big reason I love OpenOffice: it helps me combat retail customers who beg for a pirated copy of Microsoft Office. It looks and acts enough like the original that I've yet to hear a complaint back. Except, of course, that their workplace computer doesn't know what to do with OOO's native formats. Sigh. Maybe someday.

    4. Free antivirus. Thank you, Grisoft, Aliwil, Avira, Comodo, Clam, et al. With so many great, free options available to home users, I'm always surprised to see a system come in with no protection at all. It's even harder to imagine people that get suckered into paying $90 for rogue apps like SuperWin Antivirus Zapper Gold 2009 Pro Edition Plus.

    3. Your DVD backup solution. It's my stinking movie, and I should be able to have a security blanket in case the disc gets damaged. Also, thanks for including all those trailers and disabling the menu button on the DVD I bought. I use Handbrake and DVD43 to get the job done, but there are plenty of other good options out there.

    2. Your torrent client. I'm still using uTorrent, and I'll probably never switch. It's tiny and works well, and I've never used another client that was appreciably speedier. Regardless of which client you use, .torrent files provide countless hours of fun and excitement for us all - legal or otherwise!

    1. Firefox. Hands down the most used application on my computer. Firefox is a great browser, and the development community keeps pumping out great extensions for us to install. Michael Arrington once called Google Chrome a "Windows killer," but surely Firefox (and its thousands of platform independent XPI addons) is a more likely executioner.

    Feel free to chime in with the apps you'd put on your list - everyone appreciates your suggestions!
     
  2. N

    Ngereja JF-Expert Member

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    Dec 9, 2008
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    You may also try the following download tools

    1. Orbit Downloader: This is a freeware tool that supports HTTP/FTP/HTTPS/RTSP/MMS/RTMP protocols and provides a total solution to download rich media. So Orbit Downloader can be used as YouTube downloader to download YouTube more simply and easily. Additionally, you can download music and video from social music/video websites like YouTube.

    2. Free Download Manager: This is a freeware multi-thread downloader that support http/https protocals, it divides the files into packets and download all simulteneosly. It is fast.

    3. Internet Download Manager (IDM): Shareware tool, is a tool to increase download speeds by up to 5 times, resume and schedule downloads. Comprehensive error recovery and resume capability will restart broken or interrupted downloads due to lost connections, network problems, computer shutdowns, or unexpected power outages. Simple graphic user interface makes IDM user friendly and easy to use.Internet Download Manager has a smart download logic accelerator that features intelligent dynamic file segmentation and safe multipart downloading technology to accelerate your downloads. Unlike other download managers and accelerators Internet Download Manager segments downloaded files dynamically during download process and reuses available connections without additional connect and login stages to achieve best acceleration performance.

    Internet Download Manager supports proxy servers, ftp and http protocols, firewalls, redirects, cookies, authorization, MP3 audio and MPEG video content processing. IDM integrates seamlessly into Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape, MSN Explorer, AOL, Opera, Mozilla, Mozilla Firefox, Mozilla Firebird, Avant Browser, MyIE2, and all other popular browsers to automatically handle your downloads. You can also drag and drop files, or use Internet Download Manager from command line. Internet Download Manager can dial your modem at the set time, download the files you want, then hang up or even shut down your computer when it's done.

    Other features include multilingual support, zip preview, download categories, scheduler pro, sounds on different events, HTTPS support, queue processor, html help and tutorial, enhanced virus protection on download completion, progressive downloading with quotas (useful for connections that use some kind of fair access policy or FAP like Direcway, Direct PC, Hughes, etc.), built-in download accelerator, and many others.
     
  3. Invisible

    Invisible Admin Staff Member

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    10q Ngereja for the share. I lyk that...! Will modify your post by inserting em links.

    Invisible
     
  4. UncleUber

    UncleUber JF-Expert Member

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    tunaweza kuendeleza na sisi hapa
     
  5. Stefano Mtangoo

    Stefano Mtangoo Verified User

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    I cannot live well with my Box without Gnome Terminal! Thanks to Mozilla for FF and TB Libreoffice and Oh! CodeLite....Nautilus... Tired of typing with Many apps in the List, just peep in to see my Dash!
     
  6. ub16

    ub16 JF-Expert Member

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    I use applications nyingi sana in three different machines(2 Linux + 1 OS X) but I decided to look which applications are common in all them. Other applications are present in only 2 or 1 but not all, so these applications are my must have in any box:

    1. Google Chrome - Perfectly syncs all my bookmarks, passwords, and history across my notebooks and my handheld devices

    2. Emacs - I use IDEs but emacs is preferred tool on the go

    3. LibreOffice - I can't remember last time I used MS-Office, leave alone Windows itself :)

    4. Spotify - I listen to a lot of music and spotify having a Linux native client just makes it my favorite.

    5. Eclipse IDE - As much as I hate it, I still have to use it, it gets work done but at the expense of being resource hungry. If intelli wasn't expensive it would have been here, and netbeans doesn't have as many plugins as eclipse.

    6. Blender - I use it rarely but when I do I enjoy using it.
     
  7. Stefano Mtangoo

    Stefano Mtangoo Verified User

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    Are you serious? Emacs?
    Emacs and Vim are useless except for symbol of geekness. In face of GEdit/Kate and Geany why on earth would you use Emacs? Even nano is nothing but a saver when bo GUI is allowed!

    Do you pay for premium?

    Intellij Idea have Community version (I used it far back in Java days) but Netbeans is better than Eclipse. What plugins do you use that are missing in NB?
     
  8. Stefano Mtangoo

    Stefano Mtangoo Verified User

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
  9. Invisible

    Invisible Admin Staff Member

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    Hahaha,

    A lot has changed. That was 2008, 5yrs later things cannot be the same. Well, Mozilla is still top in my list!
     
  10. ub16

    ub16 JF-Expert Member

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    Ha ha, One of my professors ndo alinizoesha kutumia emacs, I though it was useless at first but I kind of liked it as I learned it, plus I learned matlab on emacs so imekuwa my tool on the go. Plus as u said, you standout from the crowd if you use emacs or vi

    Spotify, I don't pay for premium, sisikilizi music on a phone

    Eclipse, this is a tough one, and this all geeky debate on netbeans vs eclipse... I learned java on eclipse, I started using git because of how easy git plugin for eclipse was to use, I started android dev on eclipse, I learned java unit testing on eclipse, almost everything java related I did on eclipse and when I started learning other languages eclipse plugins came handy, there's a plugin for almost every language, library... etc New and Updated Solutions | Eclipse Plugins, Bundles and Products - Eclipse Marketplace
     
  11. Stefano Mtangoo

    Stefano Mtangoo Verified User

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    Well Mozilla is on top list of everybody ;)

    What about putting your current List?

    Hahahaaa!

    I wonder when Netbeans is going to support Android (have not checked v7.3 though).
    Else the religious debates have been for ages
    1. Netbeans vs Eclipse
    2. Vim vs Emacs
    3. VC++ vs GCC
    4. Python vs Perl
    5. wxWidgets vs QT
    6. C++ vs Java
    7. ...............
     
  12. ub16

    ub16 JF-Expert Member

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    1. Eclipse
    2. Emacs
    3. GCC
    4. Python (Sababu sijui Perl :D)
    5. QT (ingawa siijui vizuri)
    6. C++ (this took a lot of time to reach the conclusion)

    Then there are these debates(some old, some new):
    7. Ubuntu vs Arch Linux(pretty much every other distro)
    8. .deb vs .rpm
    9. iOS vs Android (thermonuclear war)
    10. Adobe premiere pro vs Final Cut Pro
    ....
     
  13. Stefano Mtangoo

    Stefano Mtangoo Verified User

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    Apr 21, 2013
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    7. Ubuntu
    8. deb
    9. Android
    10. Final Cut Pro

    Anyway debates never ends:
    11. Open source vs Closed source Model
    12. MyBB vs VBulletin (same to PHPBB vs SMF)
    13. Unity vs Gnome3
    14. Rhythmbox vs Banshee
    .........
     
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